Civil rights leader Medgar Evers is finally getting some of the recognition that he deserves. The home of the assassinated leader has been declared a national monument.

In February, Congress passed a bipartisan public lands bill that included the addition of four national monuments, one of which is Evers’ home. This week, the legislation was signed into law by President Trump.

Evers' wife, Myrlie, who turns 86 this week said the following in an interview:

“It will always be the home that Medgar Evers and I lived, loved and reared our children in until he was shot in the back of the driveway of our home because he fought for his beliefs of justice and equality for all citizens of the United States of America.

 

Evers’ House

Currently, the Evers’ house is managed by Tougaloo College. It was donated to the college by the Evers family in 1993. It will be taken over by the federal government where it can be preserved.

The three-bedroom home was vacant for years after the family moved out during the 1960s. It was restored in the mid-1990s. It is now filled with mid-century furniture, and one of the bedrooms has a display about the family’s history. A bullet hole is still visible in wall in the kitchen.

In 2016, The National Park Service named the home a national historic landmark.