Remember the Saharan dust that fell upon the Ark-La-Tex a couple of months ago? It's back and may make it a little rough for those with respiratory issues.

The good news is our sunsets and sunrises should look fantastic for the next several days, the bad news is, it's because of the Saharan dust in our upper atmosphere settling here in East Texas and Southwest Arkansas.

Photo by Il Vagabiondo on Unsplash
Photo by Il Vagabiondo on Unsplash
loading...

KSLA Meteorologist Jeff Castle said on his Facebook Page the other day:

We could be in for some vivid sunrises/sunsets, but if you have respiratory illness you may want to limit time outside.

Houston TV Station KHOU 11 Meteorologist Pat Cavlin put up a very good explanation of how the Saharan dust cloud gets kicked up into the upper atmosphere and makes the 6000 to 7000-mile journey to our part of the world.

Photo by NOAA on Unsplash
Photo by NOAA on Unsplash
loading...

There are some good things other than the pretty sunrise and sunsets to come out of it though, minerals and tropical suppression.

  • The minerals that are brought with the Saharan dust cloud are actually good to help replenish those used up in our soil.
  • Tropical Depression suppression, as Weatherman Pat says in the video below, it puts a layer of dry air that's not normally there in the upper atmosphere and it keeps the moisture from developing into high cloud formations. If they can't form, then neither can hurricanes.
Photo by Artin Bakhan on Unsplash
Photo by Artin Bakhan on Unsplash
loading...

Hopefully, it won't last too long, but the benefits are pretty good overall. Just be aware if you have respiratory issues.

To see the KHOU11 video, click here.

LOOK: The most extreme temperatures in the history of every state

Stacker consulted 2021 data from the NOAA's State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to illustrate the hottest and coldest temperatures ever recorded in each state. Each slide also reveals the all-time highest 24-hour precipitation record and all-time highest 24-hour snowfall.

Keep reading to find out individual state records in alphabetical order.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.
Get our free mobile app

More From Majic 93.3