Today is Day 3 of the Dereck Chauvin's murder trial for the death of George Floyd, who died almost a year ago on May 25. 

Day 2: Donald Williams Impromptu Expert Witness Testimony Continues

10:15 a.m. The trial continues with testimony from Donald Williams, a high school and college wrestler who has trained in MMA with law enforcement officers at a local Minneapolis gym, testified Monday that he recognized the "blood choke" being applied by Chauvin and that he knew it could be fatal.

"When I said it was a blood choke, it's the only time he looked up. You see Floyd fade away like the fish in the bag. He vocalized that he can't breathe and 'I'm sorry.' His eyes rolled back in his head" Williams said.

Jena Scurry, a 911 dispatcher, testified that she started to worry when she saw on a monitor that officers were kneeling on Floyd to hold him to the ground.

My instincts were telling me that something was wrong. I don't know if they had to use force or not. They got something out of the back of the squad, and all of them sat on this man. So I don't know if they needed to or not, but they haven't said anything to me yet. She said she called the sergeant to report what was happening.

Defense attorney Eric Nelson tried to discredit her testimony to jurors by saying Scurry isn't an expert on use of force techniques.

At 1:25 p.m. Tearful  testimony was heard from the teenage girl who filmed officers attempted the fatal arrest of George Floyd that was seen around the world.

The witness was not put on camera. Because she's a minor, only audio was used in testimony. In describing Chauvin, whose knee was on Floyd’s neck: “He just stared at us, looked at us. He had like this cold look, heartless,” she said. “He didn’t care. It seemed as if he didn’t care what we were saying.She said that she sometimes stays up crying, apologizing to Floyd, and wishing she could have done more to help him.

In cross-examination, defense attorney Eric Nelson asked Frazier about the crowd that had gathered becoming louder

At 4:32 p.m. Testimony was heard from a teenage witness who took video footage of the fatal arrest.

The witness was not put on camera as she was underage at the time of the incident. Prosecutors played the video from her phone.

“I almost walked away at first because it was a lot to watch. But I knew that it was wrong and I couldn’t just walk away, even though I couldn’t do anything about it," she told Minnesota Assistant Attorney General Erin Eldridge.

 

At 6:42 testimony was heard from Genevieve Hanson, the off-duty emergency medical technician present the day of George Floyd's fatal arrest.

It was very emotional and at times contentious.  Testimony was heard yesterday from Genevieve Hanson, the off-duty emergency medical technician who was present the day of George Floyd's arrest. She gave the court an account of what she witnessed based on her own expertise.

Hanson, a Minneapolis firefighter, testified that she tried to tell former officer Tou Thao that she was a first responder, but he didn't believe her and ordered her back on the sidewalk. She also testified that she pleaded with Thao to let her take George Floyd's pulse, and was denied.

Hanson testified that she knew Floyd was in distress because of the “puffy and swollen” appearance of his face and also said she saw fluid come from his body. Although she admitted she didn't know exactly from where it was coming, from her experience, it's common to see a patient release their bladder when they die.

The cross-examination was sickening.  Eric Nelson (Chauvin's attorney) cross-examined Hanson and had the audacity to ask her if she had ever fought a fire where others approached and told her how to do her job. He also asked, "what if someone threatened you" I would assume because Hanson can be heard on the video yelling obscenities at the officers. Either way... straight BS! C'mon man you can't come with nothing better? Pretty sure ya can't because you're defending a murderer.

The Judge ended the day with testimony from Hanson, who is expected resume testimony this morning.